The Art of Bugatti

The beginning of the Bugatti legacy is rooted in the mastery of fine art forms

The Bugatti name is known in the world of automobiles for exquisite design of road and race cars. What is not as well known is the four generations of contributions in other art forms and mediums. With the new exhibit The Art of Bugatti, which will run through January 14th, 2018, the Petersen is offering a deeper appreciation of the broad array of artistic talent.

 The story begins with the family patriarch, Carlo Bugatti, and his path through the arts that included architecture, painting, furniture design, and silversmithing. The exhibit moves to focus on the animal sculptures of Carlo’s son Rembrandt and how his work affected the art deco style of his older brother, Ettore Bugatti’s, cars. Numerous works of art and relics recount the family’s history from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.

The story begins with the family patriarch, Carlo Bugatti, and his path through the arts that included architecture, painting, furniture design, and silversmithing. The exhibit moves to focus on the animal sculptures of Carlo’s son Rembrandt and how his work affected the art deco style of his older brother, Ettore Bugatti’s, cars. Numerous works of art and relics recount the family’s history from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.

 Some of the exhibit highlights include the early tooling and frames used to fabricate engines and chassis for the cars. Many of these cars predate the assembly line and none of them were ever mass produced. Each car on display is of historical relevance and a work of art in its own right. Visitors can see the evolution of original designs from the 1925 Type 35 through the Type 101. An EB110 from the Italian revival of Bugatti contrasts the emphasis in design while reinforcing the dedication to innovation.  This is an exhibit that car lovers are sure to enjoy but will equally appeal to traditional fine art patrons. The Art of Bugatti will run through 2017 and is on the Artistry floor.

Some of the exhibit highlights include the early tooling and frames used to fabricate engines and chassis for the cars. Many of these cars predate the assembly line and none of them were ever mass produced. Each car on display is of historical relevance and a work of art in its own right. Visitors can see the evolution of original designs from the 1925 Type 35 through the Type 101. An EB110 from the Italian revival of Bugatti contrasts the emphasis in design while reinforcing the dedication to innovation.

This is an exhibit that car lovers are sure to enjoy but will equally appeal to traditional fine art patrons. The Art of Bugatti will run through 2017 and is on the Artistry floor.

#NowOnViewconnor wohl